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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/7695
Title: THE ROLE OF INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICE ON WATER AND SOIL CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT IN ALBUKO WOREDA, SOUTH WOLLO, ETHIOPIA
???metadata.dc.contributor.*???: TEBAREK LIKA (PhD)
ADDIS, TAYE
Keywords: Indigenous knowledge,;Land degradation
Issue Date: Jul-2014
Publisher: AAU
Abstract: The objectives of this study were to assess various aspects of indigenous knowledge and practice in water and soil conservation measures introduced in Albuko Wereda, south wollo, and to investigate how farmers have adopted Indigenous Soil and Water Conservation Measures. It also aimed at examining farmers’ views on land degradation and to assess their adoption behavior of soil and water conservation knowledge. The data for the study came mainly from farmers in the study area. Structured questionnaire survey and focus group discussion methods were applied to collect the necessary information from farm households. A total of 140 heads of households were interviewed. The collected data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, quantitative and qualitative data analysis. In Ethiopia, even though a number of soil and water conservation methods were introduced to combat land degradation, adoption of these practices remains below expectations.The results show that majority of farmers preferred Soil (Stone) bund, water diversion ditch and counter ploughing for soil and water conservation, crop rotation and mixed cropping for soil fertility amendment measures as opposed to traditional cutoff drain and fallowing. Farmers faced several constraints in adopting soil and water conservation measures. The major problems related to conservation structures include, source of pests, inconveniency during ox ploughing, reduction of farmland, labour intensiveness, difficulty in implementation, and costliness. On the contrary, farmers were knowledgeable about various indigenous Soil and Water Conservation measures but implemented some of them. They do understand the effects of erosion on crop productivity. Finally, farmers need to be provided with trainings on impact of soil erosion and available conservation measures. Information on ineffectiveness of some traditional conservation measures has to be disseminated among farmers.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/7695
Appears in Collections:Center for Environmental Studies

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