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Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Zinc Deficiency Among Pregnant Women in Selected Health Centers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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dc.contributor.advisor Gashu, Dawd (PhD)
dc.contributor.author Regassa, Kebebew
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-19T06:54:07Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-19T06:54:07Z
dc.date.issued 2017-06
dc.identifier.uri http://localhost:80/xmlui/handle/123456789/1492
dc.description.abstract Background: Many studies reveal that zinc deficiency during pregnancy leads to diverse pregnancy complications. However, evidences on the associated risk factors of zinc deficiency among pregnant women are limited and not conclusive. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence and associated risk factors of zinc deficiency among pregnant women in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods: Randomly selected 403 women were included in cross-sectional study conducted in Addis Ababa in July-August, 2016. Data on associated risk factors of zinc deficiency were gathered using a structured questionnaire. Blood samples were collected to analyze biochemical indicators. Serum zinc concentration was measured using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Statistical analysis was done using logistic regression methods. P-value<0.05at 95% confidence interval was considered statistically. Results: The mean serum zinc concentration was 63.68(+27.3) μg/dl (95% CI: 21.0 to 194.7μg/dl).The prevalence of zinc deficiency among pregnant women was 39.5% (95% CI: 34.5% – 44.2%).Morbidity during pregnancy, low intakes of foods of animal origin, coffee intake and elevated C-reactive protein were pertinent risk factor significantly associated with zinc deficiency. The risk of zinc deficiency of pregnant women with elevated CRP was two and half times higher as compared to pregnant women with normal CRP [AOR=2.48;95% (1.45, 4.24)].The risk of zinc deficiency was two times [AOR = 1.98; 95% CI (1.25, 3.14)] higher than pregnant women who had morbidity. The risk of zinc deficiency for pregnant women who didn’t consume animal source foods were [AOR = 2.11; 95% CI (1.30, 3.42)] two times higher, as compared to pregnant women who consumed animal source foods. Compared to pregnant women who didn’t not consume coffee, the risk of zinc deficiency was 2.12 times higher among those who consumed coffee [AOR = 2.12; 95 % CI (1.39, 3.42)]. Zinc level was positively associated with hemoglobin concentrations and consumption of animal source foods. Coffee intake, morbidity, and elevated CRP were negatively associated with zinc concentration. Conclusion: zinc deficiency is of public concern in the area. The problems could be combated through increasing nutrition knowledge and practices concerning consumption of zinc rich and bioavailable foods, optimal diversified foods, and use of home based phytate reduction methods, agricultural biofortification based approaches and livelihood promotion should be considered en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Addis Ababa University en_US
dc.subject Food and Nutritionl Science en_US
dc.title Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Zinc Deficiency Among Pregnant Women in Selected Health Centers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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