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ANALYSIS OF INTENSIFICATION OF DAIRY PRODUCTION SYSTEMS, BOVINE MILK QUALITY AND CONSUMPTION IN THE SMALLHOLDER DAIRYING OF ADA’A DISTRICT OF ETHIOPIA

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dc.contributor.advisor Dr. Ashenafi Mengistu, Dr. Tadesse Kuma
dc.contributor.advisor Dr. Berhanu Kuma
dc.contributor.author Habtamu, Lemma
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-29T11:02:22Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-29T11:02:22Z
dc.date.issued 2018-06
dc.identifier.uri http://localhost:80/xmlui/handle/123456789/14685
dc.description PhD Thesis en_US
dc.description.abstract This study was carried out in Ada’a district of Oromia Regional States of Ethiopia with the objectives to identify factors determining intensification of dairy production systems to shed light on the present status of market-oriented smallholder dairy operation; to analyze gender aspects of labor distribution in dairy activities in the intensifying smallholder dairying; to explore milk production, major challenges facing dairy producers and dairy opportunities; and to investigate household consumption habits of bovine milk and to assess the quality and safety of raw milk sampled during delivery at collection center. Data were collected from household-level survey of 200 dairy farmers, milk sampling, key informant interviews and direct observation. Descriptive statistics, General Linear Model (GLM), and binary logistic regression methods were employed as analytical tools. The results revealed that 77 % of respondents/dairy producers kept crossbred dairy cows only, 53.5 % acquired good manure management and crossbreeding practices, and 44 % of the sampled rural households involved in crossbreeding and cultivating improved forage crops. The binary logistic regression model results showed that herd size, farmland size, dairy training and cooperative membership had significant effects on cultivating improved forages. Dairy production system, dairying experience and herd size were significantly associated with rearing only crossbred dairy cows. Farmland size, dairy system and awareness of manure handling were significantly associated with good manure management. Further analysis of the extent of intensification indicated that mean daily milk yield per cow and household milk market share were significantly related to crossbreeding and manure management practices in combination. Most family labor input for the dairy activities was contributed by women, which increased their workload though they involved well in decisions on dairy production and had market access for fresh milk. These differed significantly among farm- households across dairy production systems and source of major income. The major challenges faced by dairy farmers were: shortage of concentrate feed and water, lack of sustainable/guaranteed improved breeding and milk marketing, dairy stock health and manure disposal, in descending order. The total bacterial count in fluid milk was slightly higher than Ethiopian minimum standard. The coliform count was in the range of the standard. Somatic cell count was higher than US standard, but it was in the range of the EU standard. The overall mean value of the milk fat (3.82%) was slightly higher than the Ethiopian Standard (ES) value (3.50%). The mean value of protein and SNF percentages were 3.25±0.32 and 7.73 ±0.86, respectively. The overall mean value of protein was similar with the Ethiopian standard value (3.20%). The dairy potentials observed included some improved herd holdings, optimal daily milk yield, dairy experience, education and use of dairying as a major income source. The majority consumed (66.5 %) and traded (94.2 %) milk at the same time. The amount of self-consumed fresh milk per farm and day by producer families varied from 0.5 to 5 liters. Eighty four percent of the dairy producers boiled milk prior to consumption. The practice of treating milk before consumption differed significantly across production systems. 8.5 % of the dairy households did not consume fresh but rather fermented/sour milk (ergo) as most of them had symptoms of lactose intolerance. In household consumption, there was a lack of 1.40-2.85 liters of milk, which is insufficient to satisfy the nutrition requirement from dairy foods. However, there are ample experiences of dairy farming, local availability, milk production, and culture of milk consumption. In conclusion, production systems-based dairy-stock breeding, manure management practices, and related input supply and alternative formal marketing options are key attributes of the intensification and improved productivity of smallholder dairying. The capacity of smallholder dairy producers need to be built through gender-sensitive dairy extension including introducing cost-effective /labor saving-dairy technology, awareness creation in family to share women workload and enable them to participate in cooperative management positions. The dairy potentials could also help as spring board to enhance the market-oriented smallholder dairy farming provided that the above-mentioned challenges are dealt and tackled. To this end, a coordinated action involving all dairy stakeholders is needed in supporting/ building capacity of smallholder dairy producers to overcome the challenges for sustainable dairy production. There is scope to improve nutrition through consuming sufficient quantities of milk by the dairy farm families and balancing the staple foods (teff and wheat) in the area. Improving milk productivity will increase the levels of milk consumption, which in turn would have great potential as a cost-effective and sustainable household food production strategy for food/nutrition security besides market orientation. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Dairy production systems en_US
dc.subject Sustainable Intensification en_US
dc.subject Farm characteristics en_US
dc.title ANALYSIS OF INTENSIFICATION OF DAIRY PRODUCTION SYSTEMS, BOVINE MILK QUALITY AND CONSUMPTION IN THE SMALLHOLDER DAIRYING OF ADA’A DISTRICT OF ETHIOPIA en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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