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ASSESSMENT OF THE CONTAMINATION OF BEEF WITH SALMONELLA AND KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND BEEF HANDLING PRACTICES ALONG BEEF SUPPLY CHAIN IN DUKEM TOWN, ETHIOPIA

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dc.contributor.advisor Dr. Fanta Desissa, Dr. Gezahegn Mamo
dc.contributor.author Zelalem, Sisay
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-29T07:18:09Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-29T07:18:09Z
dc.date.issued 2017-06
dc.identifier.uri http://localhost:80/xmlui/handle/123456789/14670
dc.description MSc Thesis en_US
dc.description.abstract Salmonella is a major cause of food borne disease in the world, with an increasing concern for the emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant strains. A cross-sectional study was conducted between November, 2016 and April, 2017 to estimate the prevalence, and determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Salmonella, and assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices along beef supply chain in Dukem town. A total of 286 samples comprising feces, carcass swab and retail meat were collected and examined for the presence of Salmonella following the standard techniques and procedures. Hundred respondents consisting of 20 abattoir workers, 20 butchery workers and 60 consumers participated in the study. Systematic random sampling and purposive sampling techniques were used to generate the desired data. The overall prevalence of Salmonella along the beef supply chain was 6.3% (95% CI: 3.9-9.7). The specific prevalence of Salmonella based on sample source was 0.9%, 2.9%, and 12.7 % in feces, carcass swab, and retail meat, respectively. There was statistically significant difference along the beef supply chain(X2 = 14.3027, P <0.05). Among the isolates, 94.4% (n=17) were resistant at least to one of the antimicrobials. All the isolates (100%) were sensitive to Kanamycin where as 94.4%, 88.9% and 83.3% of the isolates were found to be sensitive to Sufisoxazole, Tetracycline and Nalidixic acid, respectively. Multi-drug resistance was observed in 27.8% (n=5) of the isolates.Majority (95%) of abattoir workers didn’t know that contaminated carcass has public health risk. According to the respondents, falling of carcass in the dirty floor and sudden stomach cut were the major possible sources for carcass contamination. All of the abattoir and butchery workers received neither job related training nor medical check up. Most (70%) of consumers had habit of eating raw beef and 73.3% of them had no knowledge about the transmission of Salmonella via meat consumption. In conclusion, the study found the occurrence of Salmonella along beef supply chain with higher prevalence at meat retail shop and the variability in the susceptibility pattern of Salmonella isolates against the tested antimicrobials. It also showed that the existing beef handling practices, knowledge and attitudes about the importance of occurrence of Salmonella along the beef supply chain could be a potential public health risk unless the necessary intervention is in place. All stakeholders should raise awareness in minimizing the occurrence of Salmonella and thereby transmissions of resistant Salmonella to humans and risk of raw beef consumption along the beef supply chain particularly at meat retail. Moreover, identifying Salmonella serotypes circulating in the area and regular monitoring of the heath status of workers and hygienic condition of the slaughter house and meat retail shop is recommended. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Abattoir en_US
dc.subject Antimicrobial resistance en_US
dc.subject beef en_US
dc.subject contamination en_US
dc.title ASSESSMENT OF THE CONTAMINATION OF BEEF WITH SALMONELLA AND KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND BEEF HANDLING PRACTICES ALONG BEEF SUPPLY CHAIN IN DUKEM TOWN, ETHIOPIA en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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