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Effect of Planned Teaching on Essential Newborn Care Practice and Identification of Neonatal Danger Signs among Mothers in Chewaka Resettlement Area

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dc.contributor.advisor Sinshaw, Worknesh
dc.contributor.author Adem, Hasen
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-03T08:59:19Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-03T08:59:19Z
dc.date.issued 2014-06
dc.identifier.uri http://localhost:80/xmlui/handle/123456789/11838
dc.description.abstract Background: Every year over 130 million babies are born and 40 million women give birth at home globally. About 2.6 million births take place in Ethiopia and 2.34 million (90%) births per year occur in home without the help of a skilled birth attendant. Home delivery and newborn care provided by non-skilled personnel has not yet been evaluated whether the skills women have and the extent of newborn care they could provide is up to the world health organization definitions of essential newborn care. Therefore, this study was carried out to evaluate how far essential newborn care was being practiced in home delivery at Chewaka resettlement area. Objective: The main objective of this study was to evaluate effect of planned teaching on essential newborn care practice and knowledge of neonatal danger signs among mothers in Chewaka resettlement area. Methods: The study was employed by using community based a pre-experimental one-shot design was conducted among women who gave birth at home during the one year preceding the study. A total of 238 study subjects were involved in the study. Result: Newborn care practices like bathing the baby immediately after birth 38.7%, giving pre-lacteals 40.8%, late initiation of breast feeding 37%, and application of substances on umbilical cord 102 42.9% were common. The study finding shows that a low level of use of the combined newborn care indicators: good thermal care 38 (16%), safe cord care practice 64 (26.9%), good neonatal feeding 16.8% and it found that poor thermal care was driven mainly by early bathing; poor cord care by putting substances on the cord; and poor breastfeeding by giving feeds other than breast milk. Mother’s knowledge of newborn danger signs was good. In the present study the knowledge scores of mothers revealed that 64.3% of the respondents had good knowledge. Conclusion Even after years of efforts by government to reduce unhealthy newborn care practices are highly prevalent in this setting. But some of the newborn care practices may have been influenced by the health education interventions. Recommendation: The study suggests that effort should be made to stop unhealthy newborn care practice particularly, applying substances on the stump of umbilical cord, discarding colostrum, and pre lacteal feeding, and bathing the baby immediately after birth, and should be replaced by recommended practices. Keywords: Home deliveries, Essential newborn care practice, Chewaka resettlement are en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Addis Abeba University en_US
dc.subject Home deliveries, Essential newborn care practice, Chewaka resettlement are en_US
dc.title Effect of Planned Teaching on Essential Newborn Care Practice and Identification of Neonatal Danger Signs among Mothers in Chewaka Resettlement Area en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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