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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/11114
Title: IDENTIFICATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PROFILES OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS SPECIES ISOLATED FROM RAW MILK, SWABS OF UDDERS, MILKING UTENSILS AND MILKERS HANDS IN SMALL HOLDER AND DAIRY FARMS IN AMBO AND GUDER TOWN
???metadata.dc.contributor.*???: Dr. Bedaso Mamo
Dr. Ashenafi Feyisa
Lencho, Megersa
Keywords: Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles;Dairy Farms;Identification
Issue Date: 2015
Abstract: A cross sectional study was conducted in Guder and Ambo town from December to June 2015, to estimate the prevalence, determine the associated risk factors and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of isolated Staphylococcus species from raw milk, udder swabs, milkers’ hand and swabs of utensils. A total of 339 samples were collected from small holder and dairy farms. These samples contained 135 raw milk, 25 swabs from milkers’ hands, 135 swabs of udder and 44 swab samples from milking utensils. Primary and secondary biochemical tests were used to identify the Staphylococcus species; risk factors were assessed through interview and personal observation and Antibiotic disk diffusion method using Kirby Bauer technique was applied for Antimicrobial susceptibility test. Staphylococcus species identified from all samples were categorized into Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus intermedius and Staphylococcus hyicus. The prevalence of Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus hycius and Staphylococcus intermedius found from milk in the study area were 40%, 12.6%, 16.2% and 5.9%, respectively. The prevalence of Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus was 43.7% from swab of udder, 36.6% from swab of milking utensils and 40% from swab of milkers hands. In addition, the prevalence of S. aureus was 15.5% from swab of udder, 9% from swab of milking utensils and 20% from swabs of milkers hands. Using chi- square test association between risk factors and isolation of Staphylococcus species from milk was analyzed. The result indicated that the prevalence of Staphylococcus species in milk had statistically significant association based on parity (P= 0.036, usage of towels (P=0.006) and previous treatment (P= 0.022). Out of 108 coagulase positive Staphylococcus species identified, 50 isolates were subjected to 12 antimicrobial susceptibility disks (Erythromycin, Pencillin, Steptomycin, Tetracycline, Sulphamethoxazole-Trimethoprim, Vancomycin, Ciprofloxacin, Nitrofuranton, Amoxacylin, Nalidxic Acid, Doxycycline and Ampicillin) (Oxoid, Basing Stoke, UK). The result of antimicrobial susceptibility tests indicated that 100% isolated Staphylococcus aureus were resistant to Ampicillin and Penicillin, 90% to Amoxicillin, 45% to Nalidxic Acid, 40% to Tetracycline and 20% to Doxycycline. Out of tested S. intermedius isolates 100% were resistant to Ampicillin, 70% to Nalidixic Acid and Pencillin, 50% to Vancomyin and 10% to Amoxacillin. Among 20 S. hyicus isolates 90% were resistant to Ampicillin, 85% to Penicillin, 60% to Amoxacillin, 15% to Streptomycin and Tetracycline. On the contrary, all tested Staphylococcus species isolates were susceptible to Ciprofloxacin. The current study revealed that the prevalence of Staphylococcus species in raw milk was high and isolates of Staphylococcus species were resistant to a number of drugs. Therefore, raw milk should be pasteurized and handled hygienically. In addition, further research should be done on the factor favor multidrug resistant Staphylococcus species and other risk factors responsible for milk contamination in the study area.
Description: A Thesis submitted to the College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture of Addis Ababa University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Veterinary Microbiology
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/11114
Appears in Collections:Thesis - Tropical Veternery Medicine

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