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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/10459
Title: HEALTH PROBLEMS AND HEALTH COPING STRATEGIES OF AREAS EXPERIENCING FOOD SHORT AGE: PREPAREDNESS - AND RESPONSE OF THE COMMUNITY AND OF THE RESPONSIBLE BODIES
???metadata.dc.contributor.*???: Dr. Birhanu Demeke
Muluken Melese, M.D.
Keywords: STRATEGIES OF AREAS EXPERIENCING FOOD SHORT AGE: PREPAREDNESS - AND RESPONSE OF THE COMMUNITY
Issue Date: 30-Dec-1998
Publisher: AAU,1998
Abstract: A cross sectional study was conducted with the objective of assessing health problems, health coping strategies and health care demand of non-displaced communities which are in food crisis. The study consisted of a household survey (n=53 I households), Focus Group Discussions( N=l 0 groups) and an individual in• depth interview of government officials ( n = 9) through which quantitative and qualitative data were collected. The study Woreda (district) of North Wollo Zone, Amahara Regional State, Ethiopia. The district was highly affected by the famines of the 1970s and 1980s and has been facing repeated food shortages ever since. ln the three months recall period 748(29.4%) of the 2,547 household members reported being ill, out of which only 122 ( 16.3%) sought western-style medical care. The main reason (72.7% of the responses) for not seeking medical care was lack of money to cover the medical cost and/or for transportation and accommodation. Most households had not recovered from the past famines' economic shock, due to the recurrent nature of food production failure. The annual per capita income in the surveyed population was found to be 310.4 (US $ 43 .7). Information was obtained from 148 households on the health- cost coping mechanisms; these were 72(48.6%) of the households from the sale of animals and animal products, 32(21.6%) from the sale of grains and the rest from Joans, savings, sale of household utensils and fire-wood, and working in food-for-work or cash-for work programmes. The most vulnerable groups who were severely affected by the current food crisis were elders, women-beaded households and those who have no productive assets, i.e, the poor. About half of the 53 J studied households had no single animal; 55.5 were currently dependent on food aid. This finding shows the exhaustion of the health• cost- coping strategies of the communities. A relatively high number of the households (24.6%) were found to consume a famine food (Lathyrus Sativus) which causes neuro-toxicity when consumed for along period as a main diet. The I ine ministry offices, from the region to the district, lack trained manpower in disaster management; there is a tendency for them to forward all disaster issues to the specific government authority for disaster management issues, the Disaster Prevention and Preparedness Commission (DPPC).The study recommendations are as follows: a) Health aid should be part of food aid package; b) Special attention should go to the most vulnerable groups of the community; and c) Training of disaster managers at all levels is mandatory for a better hand I ing of disasters.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/10459
Appears in Collections:Thesis - Public Health

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