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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/874

Title: ADOPTION OF PHYSICAL SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION STRUCTURES IN ANNA WATERSHED, HADIYA ZONE, ETHIOPIA
Authors: Ertiro, Habtamu
Advisors: Dr Woldeamlak Bewket
Copyright: 2006
Date Added: 22-Apr-2008
Publisher: Addis Ababa University
Abstract: The objectives of this study were to describe soil conservation measures introduced to the area and to investigate how farmers have adopted introduced conservation measures. It also aimed to assess factors that affect farmers’ adoption. The data for the study came mainly from farmers in the study catchment. It was analyzed using two methods: descriptive and regression methods. Soil conservation measures introduced to the area can be grouped into three depending on the land use type in which they are installed. The first; soil conservation measures on cultivated fields, these are the most dominant ones. They include, soil bunds and fanya juu. The second; soil conservation measures on degraded hillsides, they include area closure, hillside terrace, micro-basins and plantations. The third; soil conservation measures to rehabilitate gullies, they include Brash wood check-dams and Rock fill/ loose rock check-dams. Farmers responded to soil conservation measures introduced on cultivation fields differently. From 110 respondents, 53% removed conservation structures completely, 20% removed selectively and the remaining 21% of the interviewee retained these structures in their original state. It was found that farmers’ decision to remove completely, to remove selectively or retain in the original state is influenced by different factors. Farmers that perceive the problem of soil erosion better, plan to continue in the farming, and try new technologies are more likely to retain conservation structures. Likewise, farmers that cultivate their own lands, attended soil conservation trainings and those perceived traditional conservation measures to be less effective in retaining soil erosion compared to the introduced soil conservation technologies are more likely to make decision to retain conservation structures installed on their farmland. On the contrary, farmers that are old, having large farmland, plowing black soil and involved in off-farm activities are less likely to retain conservation structures. Different measures need to be undertaken to address the problem of low level of adoption of conservation structures. Appropriate conservation measures need to be found out instead of heavy reliance on the physical conservation measures especially on cultivation fields. Farmers also need to be made aware of the economic significance of soil erosion on the cultivated fields better. Farmers that lack required labor need to be provided with supports that enable them to retain conservation structures. Farmers that try new technologies by themselves on their own land also need to be targeted. Farmers need to be provided with trainings on impact of soil erosion and available conservation measures. Information on ineffectiveness of traditional conservation measures has to be disseminated among farmers. Furthermore, farmers have to be made remain on the agricultural sector, by making the sector more productive, and cultivate their own land.
Description: A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES OF ADDIS ABABA UNIVERSITY IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTERS OF ARTS IN REGIONAL AND LOCAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/874
Appears in:Thesis - Regional and Local Development

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