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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/609

Title: ADEQUACY OF TREATMENT OF FOOD SECURITY ISSUES IN THE UPPER PRIMARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM
Authors: Markos, Tadesse
Advisors: Dr. Derebssa Dufera
Copyright: 2002
Date Added: 19-Apr-2008
Publisher: Addis Ababa University
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the adequacy of treatment of food security issues in the upper primary curriculum of the Amhara Region. Content analysis of three purposefully selected subjects (Basic science, Biology and Social studies) of grades 5 to 8 was used to collect data on food security issues in the curriculum. A questionnaire targeted at teachers from 10 purposefully selected urban and rural upper primary schools was also used to collect data on the practicality of selected methodologies and activities in the teaching learning processes. The content analysis was undertaken by using coding sheet that operationalize the basic questions of the study. In order to determine the adequacy of food security contents in the curriculum, paragraphs were used as unit of measure; categories acknowledged by the food security literature as vital and supporting to the food security agenda were employed; and criteria was set to determine the number of paragraphs required for adequacy. The questionnaire was administered to 80 urban and rural upper primary school teachers, who are currently teaching Basic Science, Biology and Social studies in grades 5 to 8. Findings of the content analysis and the questionnaire were analysed by using simple descriptive statistics, such as frequency distribution and percentages. Findings show that, in Basic Science and Biology curriculum, two vital categories of food security (namely, food availability and utilization issues) were adequately treated. However, in the above materials, the other two vital categories (i.e., food access and coping strategies) were inadequately treated to not-at-all-treated. As far as the supporting issues are concerned, natural resource conservation, population and family life education and HIV/AIDS education were adequately treated in Basic science and Biology curricular materials. On the other hand, issues related to role of women in the environment were not at all treated in the same materials. In social studies curriculum, all the vital categories were inadequately to not-atall- treated. Out of the supporting issues, contents related to natural resource conservation and population were adequately treated; where as HIV/ AIDS education and role of women were not at all treated. The most dominantly described and practiced methodologies in all the sample curricular materials and schools were teachers' presentation and discussion. Furthermore, all the selected activities that are known to play important role in the implementation of food security concepts were inadequately to not at all described and practiced in the curricular materials, and the teaching-learning processes respectively. It was finally concluded that, the not-at-all treated and the inadequately treated contents of food security issues should be given proper consideration during curriculum revision programs. Besides, methodologies that would enhance students' participation such as project work, experimentation, demonstration, role-play and dramatization, and activities that would promote hands-onexperience such as school gardening practices, environmental protection activities, and exercises within school pedagogical centres should be given particular emphasis in the curriculum development and implementation.
Description: A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES ADDIS ABABA UNIVERSITY IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION IN CURRICULUM STUDIES
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/609
Appears in:Thesis - Curriculum & Instruction

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