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Title: WOODY SPECIES COMPARISONS BETWEEN CONSERVED AND COMMUNAL SITES AND WOODY PLANT USE BY LOCAL COMMUNITIES: A CASE STUDY OF ESELENKEI AND KIMANA GROUP RANCHES IN SOUTHERN KAJIADO, KENYA
Authors: SUZANNE, TAPAPUL
Date Added: 3-Sep-2007
Abstract: A study that combined vegetation analysis with ethnobotanical approach was undertaken in Eselenkei and Kimana Group Ranches, in southern Kajiado, Kenya. The study particularly looked at the impact of setting aside conservation areas on woody species in traditionally pastoral rangelands. Systematic sampling was carried out to compare woody species diversity, density, regeneration. Quantitative ethnobotanical methods based on semi-structured interviews, paired comparisons of threatening activities to woody species and researcher’s observations were also employed. These were to evaluate local community attitudes to conservation areas, their woody plant use and single out one most threatening activity to the existence of woody species in the two Group Ranches. Shannon-Wiener diversity index (H’) of woody species was 1.078 and 1.758 in Eselenkei and 1.290 and 1.116 in Kimana in conserved and communal sites respectively and did not differ significantly in both cases (P>0.05). Mean woody species density in Eselenkei was 290.52 stems/ha and 280.17stems/ha in conserved and communal sites respectively. In Kimana, the mean woody density was 67.19 stems/ha and 107.82 stems/ha in Acacia xanthophloea woodland and 97 stems/ha and 57 stems/ha in Acacia tortilis woodland in conserved and communal sites respectively. There were no significant differences in mean densities in both study areas in conserved and communal sites (P>0.005). More seedlings and saplings were recorded in conserved areas than at communal areas in both sites, though the differences were not significant (P>0.05). Fifty two percent of respondents in both sites were positive towards the conservation area within their Group Ranches. Men were more positive towards the conservation area in both sites compared to women. Knowledge distribution of local plant use was not significantly different between gender but the elderly were more knowledgeable than the youth (P<0.05). Charcoal production in Kimana, and fencing and construction at Eselenkei were identified as the most threatening activities to woody species. Continuous monitoring of woody species within conserved and communal areas can help detect changes and associated threats. Community members should equally participate in natural resource management plans to develop effective conservation and sustainable utilization of woody species. Conservation of the natural resource base needs to target on the entire ecosystem, as revealed by multiple uses of various woody species by the local community.
Description: A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATES STUDIES OF ADDIS ABABA UNIVERSITY IN PARTIAL FULLFILMEMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE IN DRYLAND BIODIVERSITY
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/59
Appears in:Thesis - Biology

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