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Title: Assessment of Bacterial Profile and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections in Comparison with non-catheterized Urinary tract infections in Jimma University Hospital, Southwest Ethiopia
Authors: LULE, TESHAGER
Advisors: Dr. Daniel Asrat
Copyright: 2005
Date Added: 19-Apr-2008
Publisher: Addis Ababa University
Abstract: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infection. They have become the most common hospital acquired infections, accounting for as many as 35% of nosocomial infections, and are usually associated with catheterization. The aim of this study is to assess the bacterial profile and antimicrbial resistance pattern of catheter associated urinary tract infection in comparison with non-catheter associated UTI. One hundred and twenty urine specimens (30 from catheterized patients and 90 from non-catheterized patients with symptoms of UTI) were screened for the presence of significant bacteruria from January to March 2005. Bacteriological screening of catheterized urine and clean catch mid-stream urine revealed that 13/30 (43.3%) and 20/90 (22.3%) had significant bacteriuria, respectively (P<0.05). All samples taken from patients who have been catheterized for 2 weeks or more showed significant bacteruria. In both group the rate of infection was higher in female patients. Older patients (>50years old) were found to be the most affected age group (46%) among catheterized patients whereas most of the non-catheterized patients with significant bacteruria belonged to age group 11-12 years. Among catheterized patients, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species were found to be the most frequently isolated pathogens (each of them accounts 23 %) followed by coagulase negative Staphylococci (15 %). The most frequently isolated species from non-catheterized patients was Klebsiella (40 %) followed by E. coli (30 %). Resistance rates (56.3 % to 100%) to Ampicillin, amoxicillin, cephalexin, carbenicillin, and Trimethoprime/sulfamethoxazole were observed in all organisms isolated from both groups. In addition, resistance rates to gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, and nalidixic acid were observed in all bacteria isolated from catheterized patients. In general, in this study, high level multidrug resistance in both groups indicated that it is time to reconsider the empirical use of the commonly used antimicrobial agents in Ethiopia. Particularly, increasing vii resistance in pathogens isolated from catheterized patients is frustrating. Because the most important risk factors for UTI is duration of catheterization indwelling urinary catheterization should be avoided or at least minimized.
Description: A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES, ADDIS ABABA UNIVERSITY IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE EQUIREMENTS FOIN FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/587
Appears in:Thesis - Medical Microbiology

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