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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/533

Title: THERMOTOLERANT CAMPYLOBACTER SPECIES IN FARM ANIMALS AS A POTENTIAL RISK TO PUBLIC HEALTH IN JIMMA ZONE, SOUTHWEST ETHIOPIA
Authors: TESFAYE, KASSA
Advisors: Dr. Daniel Asrat
Dr. Solomon G/Silassie
Copyright: 2004
Date Added: 16-Apr-2008
Publisher: Addis Ababa University
Abstract: Thermotolerant campylobacters particularly C. jejuni and C. coli have been established as causative agents of diarrhoeal diseases in humans worldwide. These organisms are widely distributed and present in most warm-blooded domestic and wild animals. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. in various farm animals and to analyze the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Campylobacter isolates. A cross sectional study was conducted from rural setting in peri-Jimma town area (Merrewa peasant association) and in Jimma town (Jimma University Agriculture College and Jimma Dairy Development Enterprise). Fecal specimens from four hundred eighty five were collected on a systematic sampling technique from cattle (n=205), poultry (n=191), sheep (n=71), and pigs (n=18) during the period of January and February 2004. All specimens were cultured on selective media and isolated strains of Campylobacter spp were tested for antibiogram activity using standard disk diffusion techniques. Campylobacter spp. were isolated from 192 (39.6%) of the 485 fecal specimens investigated [130/192 (67.7%) were from poultry, 27/192 (14.1%)from sheep, 26/192 (13.5%) from cattle and 9/192 (4.7%) from pigs]. Of the isolates that were identified to species level, C. jejuni accounted for 70 %, C. coli 27 %, and C. lari 3 %. The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern for 192 strains of the isolates showed 100% resistance to cephalothin followed by, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (37.0%), ampicillin (20.0%), nalidixic acid and streptomycin (6.3 % each). All strains were sensitive to ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol. More than 95% of the strains were sensitive to erythromycin, tetracycline, clindamycin, gentamicin, and norfloxacin. Multi-resistance to two or more antimicrobial agents was observed in 14.6% of all campylobacter strains tested. This study indicates that farm animals could serve as a potential source of human infections. Thus, hygienic steps should be followed during handling of food of animal origin. Moreover, if extensive veterinary use of antimicrobial drugs continues, there is a considerable risk that the spread of resistant organisms will seriously limit the future usefulness of these antimicrobial agents in the treatment of Campylobacter infections in humans.
Description: A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES, ADDIS ABABA UNIVERSITY IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTERS OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/533
Appears in:Thesis - Medical Microbiology

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