AAU-ETD AAU-ETD
 

Addis Ababa University Libraries Electronic Thesis and Dissertations: AAU-ETD! >
College of Education >
Thesis - Social Psychology >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/3852

Title: THE INFLUENCE OF SOME PSYCHOLOGICAL VARIABLES ON ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF STUDENTS IN HIGH SCHOOLS, THE CASE OF ARSIZONE
Authors: ASSEFA, TAFA
Advisors: Dr. Abraham Husain,
Keywords: PSYCHOLOGICAL VARIABLES
ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF STUDENTS
Copyright: May-1998
Date Added: 21-Nov-2012
Publisher: AAU
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to find out the joint and relative contributions of locus of control, achievement motivation future time orientation, and sex to the prediction of academic achievement of high school students. Moreover, the study aimed at investigating (1) sex differences in locus of control, achievement motivation, and future time orientation; (ii) the relation of these variables to the academic achievements of male and female students; (iii) joint and relative contribution of these variables to the prediction of the academic achievement in each sex group. The subjects participated in this study were 303 regular (157 male and J 46 female) students of high schools in Arsi Region. The method used to sellect the subjects was stratified multi-stage sampling. The instruments employed in data collection were Children's Nowicki and Strickland lnternal- External scale (Nowicki & Strickland J 973), achievement motivation questionnaire (Hermans, J 970), and future time orientation scale (Gjesme, J 979). Academic achievement scores of the subjects were secured from rosters. Multiple regression analysis, t-test, correlation, and correlation difference test were employed in the nalysis of the data. Accordingly, the result of multiple regression analysis indicated that locus of control, achievement motivation, future time orientation and sex have significant joint contributions to the prediction of high school students' academic achievement. However, further analysis of beta weights of each variable demonstrated that only sex and future time orientation have significant relative contribution to the prediction of the academic achievement of the group. With regard to sex differences in locus of control, achievement motivation, and future time orientation, t-test revealed nonsignificant differences between the two sex groups in these variables. According to the result of the correlation procedure, locus of control and future time orientation were significantly related to academic achievement of female students, while achievement motivation was not. On the other hand, non of the three variables was significantly related to the academic achievement of the male group; and hence there was no need of carrying out regression analysis for this group. As implied by correlation coefficients, correlation difference test confirmed that locus of control and future time orientation were related to the academic achievements of female students more strongly than to those of male students. But the strength of relationship between achievement motivation and academic achievement was not significantly different for both sex groups. The result of multiple regression analysis on the data of female students showed that locus of control, achievement motivation and future time orientation had significant joint contribution to the prediction of academic achievement of this group. Nevertheless, further analysis of beta weights of each variable revealed that only future time orientation has significant relative contribution to the prediction of the academic performances of this sex group. Discussions and conclusions have been made on the basis of these results. Finally" some implications were indicated for possible interventions and for further inquiries
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/3852
Appears in:Thesis - Social Psychology

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
ASSEFATAFA.pdf51.44 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Items in the AAUL Digital Library are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

  Last updated: May 2010. Copyright © Addis Ababa University Libraries - Feedback