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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/3847

Title: WOMEN'S PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION IN ETHIOPIA
Authors: ABEBAYEHU, AEMERO
Advisors: Ato Ayalew Shibeshi
Keywords: WOMEN'S PARTICIPATION
EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION
Copyright: Jun-1995
Date Added: 21-Nov-2012
Publisher: AAU
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to make an investigation into some of the factors that resulted in the underrepresentation of women in educational administration in Ethiopia. Both micro (internal) and macro (external) variables were treated to meet the objective of this study. These included the effect of sex role socialization, the state of home-work interface, the impact of institutional sex segre$ation mechanisms and the level of women's aspiration to positions ln educational management. Besides, with the intention to determine how effectively practising female educational administrators discharge their duties, comparison was made between the managerial styles of female and male school principals as viewed by their staff. The data were collected through questionnaire and interview with 205 female and 192 male teachers, 12 female and 12 male school principalS 10 male inspectors and 6 female educational administrators currently working at Ministry of Education. . Various statistical techniques such as percentages, t-test, chi-square, the correlation coefficient, z-test and ANOVA were used to analyse the data. The results suggested that at individual level teachers of both sexes developed attitudes largely consistent with traditional assignment of role according to gender. For most respondents the role of women were, thus , perceived to be teaching than educational leadership. On the other hand, the effect of women's family commitments were not evidenced as so severe as had been conceived in blocking their initial entry to educational management. However, family related factors were still influencial variables in limiting the up-ward mobility of women who ones secured entry level administrative positions. Differential treatments during anticipatory socialization and limited access of women to get their same sex role model represented among personnel promotion committee are some of the institutio~al variables that promote opportunities along sexual lines. Besides, the finding disclosed low level of institutional commitment to undertake affirmative action scrategies and supportive mechanisms that may help reduce the existing gender gap in educational management. Generally, while women showed less aspiration to positions in educational management, the findings from this study did not make clear whether this is a response to limited opportunity accompanying discrimination, or a choice on the part of women for their role in the society, suggesting an area for further research. The observed resul t regarding the leadership styles of female and male school principals showed no significant sex difference in most of the dimensions the groups were assessed. Thus, this result provided evidence which defies the socialization assumption of skill deficiencies in managerial role as explanation for women's gross inequalities in the field. Finally, sex unbiased anticipatory socialization in schools, short and long term trainings for female teachers, change on the organizational culture of schools, the representation of female role models among the promotion committee, and the introduction of career counseling programs were forwarded as major recommendations in order to help improve these variables and facilitate women's entry and advancement in educational administration.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/3847
Appears in:Thesis - Educational Leadership & Management

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