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Title: Avian diversity based on habitat difference at Geto and Gembejo areas, southwest Shoa, Ethiopia
Authors: Teklu, Gosaye
Advisors: Afework Bekele(Prof.)
Keywords: birds of Geto and Gembejo
Erica
species composition and highland biodiversity
Copyright: Jul-2011
Date Added: 5-Jul-2012
Publisher: Addis Ababa University
Abstract: The present study on avian diversity based on habitat difference was conducted at Geto and Gembejo in Kersa Malima Woreda in Southwest Shoa Zone of Oromia region, Ethiopia. Six habitats were identified for counting birds using line transect and point count methods. Data were analyzed using Shannon-Weaver and Simpson’s diversity Indies and Simpson’s similarity index. Altogether 120 species bird were recorded, of which 81 were during the wet season and 112 were during the dry season. They belonged to 39 families and 15 orders. This area holds Endemic species (five only in Ethiopia and seven in highlands of Ethiopia and Eritrea) and six globally threatened species, which have high priority of conservation concern. Plain habitat constitutes the highest number (76) of species, followed by shrubland habitat (65). The highest species diversity index recorded was from woodland habitat during the dry season (H’= 3.3) and lowest was from ericaceous habitat during the dry season (H’= 1.94). Mean difference comparisons of species abundance between garden and shrubland, garden and woodland, garden and Erica, and woodland and Erica habitats are not significantly different at 0.05 level. Similarly, the multiple comparisons of mean difference of species richness among garden and plain, garden and shrubland, Erica and plain, Erica and agriculture, Erica and shrubland, and Erica and woodland habitats are significantly different. The highest species similarity was between dry and wet season of garden habitat (SI=0.87), followed by agriculture habitat during the dry season and shrubland habitat during the dry season (SI=0.85). The demographic growth and the increasing negative impacts of human activities have greatly reduced the resources in this study area. Timely action should be taken to tackle this problem in the study area.
Description: A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES OF ADDIS ABABA UNIVERSITY IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF LIFE SCIENCE IN ZOOLOGICAL SCIENCES PROGRAM UNIT
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/3290
Appears in:Thesis - Biology

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