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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2510

Title: SEROPREVALENCE OF HBV AND POTENTIAL RISK FACTORS AMONG HEALTH PROFESSIONALS IN PUBLIC HOSPITALS ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA
Authors: ZELALEM, DESALEGN
Advisors: Dr. Solomon G/ Selassie
Keywords: Health professionals;
HBsAg
universal precaution;
occupational risk
Needle stick injury
sharp injury
vaccination status;
Copyright: May-2011
Date Added: 4-May-2012
Abstract: Abstract Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a major global health problem. More than three-quarters of HBV infections occur in Asia, the Middle East and Africa. Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at risk of acquiring hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections via exposure to patients’ blood and body fluids. Hepatitis B virus infection is a recognized occupational hazard as non-immune health professionals stand at risk of getting infected from their work. Objectives: The study aimed at investigating the distribution of HBV and associated risk factors among health professionals in public hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods: Data were obtained from a cross sectional survey conducted in St. Paul’s and Zewditu hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia among health professionals from November 2010 to January 2011. A convenient sampling method was employed to get the required sample size. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on socio-demographic characteristics and risk factors. A 5ml blood was collected, centrifuged and the serum was analyzed for HBsAg using Instant HBsAg kit. Descriptive and logistic regression models were used for analysis. Results: Among the 254 participants, the sero-prevalence of current hepatitis B virus infection was 2.4%. Majority of the study subjects, which account 184(72.4%) and 153(60.2%) of them were exposed for blood while ungloved and for other body fluid, respectively. Prevalence of sustained needle stick injuries (NSIs) and sharp injury was 155(61.2%) and 127(50%), respectively. Consistent use of gloves was reported by 52.4% of respondents. Only 9(3.5%) of respondents were vaccinated against hepatitis B virus infection. HCWs who had no knowledge about universal precaution guidelines were more likely to have been exposed to hepatitis B virus infection (AOR=7.96; 95% CI: 1.295-48.966; P= 0.025). Conclusion and Recommendation: Exposure for potentially infectious body fluids, NSI and sharp injury and other risk factors was high in this study. However, yet only very small percentages of health professionals were vaccinated. Therefore, health professionals should be vaccinated at the time of entry in service and universal precaution should be emphasized for preventing the occupational risk for HBV among health professionals.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2510
Appears in:Thesis - Medical Microbiology

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