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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2372

Title: ASSESSMENT OF THE MAGNITUDE, PATTERNS AND DETERMINANT FACTORS OF HEALTH WORKER MIGRATION FROM THE PUBLIC HEALTH SECTORS: A descriptive case study in East Hararghe zone of Oromiya, Eastern Ethiopia.
Authors: Jundi, a. Ture
Advisors: Dr.Getnet Mitike [MD, MPH]
Keywords: WORKER
MIGRATION
Copyright: Jun-2008
Date Added: 3-May-2012
Publisher: AAU
Abstract: Background: Human resources for health have become a topical issue at local, regional and global levels. Addressing the current state of human resources crisis in health system is crucial because the situation of the health workforce has become a critical challenge for sub-Saharan Africa. It is suggested that without renewed emphasis on the health workforce crisis, it will be hard for African countries like Ethiopia to attain the health-related Millennium Development Goals by 2015. Objective: The main objective of study was to assess the magnitude and patterns of health workers migration and to explore the potential factors leading to the attrition of health workers from the public health sectors in East Hararghe of Oromiya, Eastern Ethiopia. Methodology: A descriptive case study was used as study design and a mix of quantitative and qualitative method of data collection with appropriate procedures was employed. Results: A total of 205 different professional categories of health workers included in the study. Out of 168 health workers responded to the questionnaire, 83.9 % said that on average 4-8 health workers from each professional category leave the public health sectors each year. The reviewed documents showed that turnover rate in 1999 E.C were 66.7% for Physicians and 36.8% for nurses. About three-quarter (76.2%) of respondents were not happy with their management, more than half 51.8 % reported poor management and leadership were the main reason for health workers migration from public health sectors and almost all of focus group discussants strongly agreed that their management were lacked common management and leadership skills like motivation, supervision and communication. While, about 35% of the health workers indicated that insufficient salaries and incentives to cover basic needs are a major reason for health workers attrition. The majorities (63.1%) of study participants were not satisfied by their salaries and incentives. The respondents also revealed that high work stress, favoritism, shortages of essential equipments and absence of specific human resource policy were also contributing to the health workforce crisis. The group discussant cited that the migration had great effect on health care delivery, other health professional and economic development of the country. Conclusion: The study showed that there was high rate of migration of health workers in the zonal health system. Poor management skills at different levels of zonal health system were reported as causes of health workers migration by majority of study participants. Low salaries and incentives among the financial factors were also identified as push factors leading to migration. Political and policy gaps also contributed to the problem. In general, migration threatens the functioning of the health system by reducing service provision and creating inefficient use of resources leading to a serious threat to the development of the country.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2372
Appears in:Thesis - Public Health

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