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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1954

Title: SETTLEMENT AND INTEGRATION OF ‘RASTAFARIANS’ IN SHASHEMENE, OROMIA REGION ETHIOPIA
Authors: SOLOMON, SOROTO
Advisors: Dr. Kofi Ababio
Copyright: 2008
Date Added: 22-Jan-2009
Publisher: Addis Ababa University
Abstract: Despite the longer history of enthusiastic welcome to Rastafarians into the country -Ethiopia, empirical work on the level of their integration with the local society in Shashemene has been largely scant. This study explores some of the relevant literatures on repatriation and integration, and how the concept would be explained in a Rastafarian context. Historical background and development of Rastafarian settlement has also been presented from the perspectives of Rastafarians in Shashemene. Regardless of enduring to settle for about four decades, the aftermath of Rastafarians’ episode of flow to Shashemene had gained little attention. In order to narrow such gap, this study aimed at investigating to what extent Rasta immigrants in Shashemene are integrated into Ethiopian society by utilizing a variety of qualitative and quantitative data. Based on the primary fieldwork, the empirical work involved interviews with a different group of people including Rasta immigrants, local people, and government officials identified with purposive and cluster snowball-sampling methods. Questionnaires were also administered for 139 Rasta respondents selected based on the probability sampling technique. The findings of this study reveals the four major dimensions of integration as a way of measuring settlement outcomes for both immigrants and hosts, and whether social integration has been achieved or not. Accordingly, the socio-economic (chapter four), cultural and political (chapter five) dimensions are discussed using their respective key indicators as a tool to measure immigrants’ integration with the local society. The paper identifies elements central to perceptions of what constitutes ‘successful’ integration. Notwithstanding empirical gaps and methodological flaws, available evidence suggests that immigration (‘Repatriation’ and ‘spiritual pilgrimage’ as they prefer to call it) have considerably worthier to satisfy spiritual needs of Rastafarians than their living conditions and spurred economic activity. While it seems too early to generate firm conclusions, current knowledge (results) suggests that Rastafarian immigrants had never yet secured their integration with local society since they choose to maintain their cultural and religious identities in community-based life and/or with the Rasta livity of ‘natural’ life-style. For being prepared for the movement, the majority of Rastafarians are self-sufficient, which signifies partial economic integration. However, the process of building inter-personal and inter-group relations remained unsatisfactory as a result of different barriers such as language incompetence, religious and cultural differences, isolated settlement patterns, discriminations and prejudices, lack of residence permits, and poor access to social services and other relevant information.
Description: A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES OF ADDIS ABABA UNIVERSITY IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENT FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS IN SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1954
Appears in:Thesis - Social Anthropology

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